The Bugwood Network

Forest Tree Planting

U.S.

  • Each year Americans plant at least 1.6 billion trees  or about 6 trees for each one we use.  Of this total, forest products companies plant about half, or threequarters of a billion trees, annually.  These figures actually understate the nation's true reforestation rate as they don't include millions of hardwood trees that are not planted because they regrow naturally. 
  • An average of almost 5,000,000 new trees are planted each day in the U.S.
  • Partly as a result of a strong reforestation record, the growth of U.S. forests exceeds the amount harvested by 33%  confirming that trees are a renewable resource and that we are renewing them.
  • There is an important but often overlooked distinction between deforestation and timber harvesting.  Developing countries sometimes clear land of trees (deforest) for agriculture, grazing and other uses.  But in the U.S., woodlands are typically managed and reforested after harvest so as to grow future forests.  We call this sustainable forestry.   In fact, the U.S. today has virtually the same number of forested acres it had in 1920  despite the enormous increase in population and per capita wood use since then.  We are not deforesting the United States.  We are voluntarily replacing what we use, and without government regulation.
  • Forest products companies own only 14% of all the timberland in the U.S., compared with private individuals who own 59%, and public agencies which own 27%.  Yet forest products companies each year plant 43% of all the trees planted in the United States on little more than 1 million acres of industry timberland.
  • Each year, some 1.6 billion seedlings are planted in the U.S.--more than 5 new trees a year for each American.
  • The forest industry plants more than 43% of the 1.6 billion seedlings are planted annually in the U.S.; 40% are planted by nonindustrial private landowners; and 16% by government.
  • In 1994 nearly 2.5 million acres were planted with trees in the United States on rural lands of all ownerships. This compares with 2.5 million acres planted in 1992 and 2.4 million acres planted in 1993.
  • Of the 2.5 million acres planted to trees in 1994, National Forests accounted for 10% of the total acreage; 43% of the total was planted on forestry industry lands; 42% of nonindustrial private lands; and all other ownerships contributed 5% of the total acreage planted.
  • In 1994, 1.5 billion nursery tree seedlings were produced in the U.S.  The forest industry nurseries produced 49% of these tree seedlings; State and local governments 29%; other industry 15%; and Federal agencies 7%.
  • Under the 1956 to 1960 Soil Conservation Reserve Program (Soil Bank), 2.2 million acres of new pine plantations (afforestation) were planted on former cropland nation-wide.
  • Under the 1986 to 1992 Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), 2.5 million acres of new pine plantations (afforestation) were planted on former cropland nation-wide.
  • In 1995 in the U.S., trees were planted on 2,421,861 acres, timber stand improvement was completed on 3,162,575 acres, and nursery production totaled 1,651,123,000 trees.
  • In 1995 in the U.S., of the 2.4 million acres of trees planted, 11.7% was on federal land, 3.7% was on non-federal public land, 42.8% was on forest industry lands, 2.3% was on other industry lands, and 39.5% was on non-industrial private lands.

South

  • Each year the South's landowners (industrial and non-industrial) plant approximately 1.2 billion new trees, an average of 3,288,000 trees per day.
  • Under the 1956 to 1960 Soil Conservation Reserve Program (Soil Bank) 1.9 million acres of new pine plantations (afforestation) were planted on former cropland in the U.S. South.
  • Under the 1986 to 1992 Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) 1.3 million acres of new pine plantations (afforestation) were planted on former cropland in the U.S. Southeast.
  • In 1995 in the U.S. South, trees were planted on 1,689,981 acres, or 69.8% of all tree planting in the U.S.

Georgia

  • Georgia set a world record for tree planting in 1988 . . . 603,000 regenerated acres.
  • Georgia ranked number one in acres of trees planted in the U.S. in 1993 with 284,482 acres planted to trees.
  • In 1994 Georgia led the nation in tree planting, with nearly 330,000 acres, 13% of the nation's total.
  • In 1995, Georgia planted 287,247 acres of trees, the most of any state in the U.S.; 54% non-industrial private; 45% forest industry.
  • Since 1981, Georgians have replanted nearly 5 million acres in trees to ensure that future forests will continue to support our economy and environment in this sustainable use.
  • Since 1981, over 650,000 acres of forests in Georgia have been naturally regenerated.
  • Reforestation, using improved loblolly and slash pine nursery stock, can improve per acre timber yields by 10 percent or more.
  • Georgia has replanted more than 3 billion trees over the past decade.
  • Under the 1956 to 1960 Soil Conservation Reserve Program (Soil Bank) 693,499 acres of new pine plantations (afforestation) were planted on former cropland in Georgia.
  • Under the 1986 to 1992 Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) 645,931 acres of new pine plantations (afforestation) were planted on former cropland in Georgia.
  • According to a 1988 USDA report, after the CRP enrollment, there are still 1.1 million marginal cropland and pasture acres in Georgia that if planted to forest crops would earn higher producer incomes than the current crops and pasture uses.
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Last updated on Monday, January 11, 2016 at 01:41 PM
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