The Bugwood Network

Coordination of Burning

United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service Southern Region, February 1989; Technical Publication R8-TP 11.

Purpose Time of Burn Size of Burn Type of Fire Frequency Remarks
Reduce Fires Winter Large enough to break fuel continuity Not critical. Do not ring fire. 2 to 4 years. Use line-backing fire, or point-source fires under moist conditions for initial burn. Grid-firing technique excellent for maintenance of burns.
Improve Wildlife Habitat         General - Protect transitional or fringe areas. Do not burn stream bottoms.
Deer Winter preferred Small or leave unburned areas Backing fire or point-source fires 2 to 4 years Want to promote sprouting and keep browse within reach. Repeat summer fires may kill some rootstocks.
Turkey Winter preferred; summer burns in July-August Small or leave unburned areas Backing fire or point-source fires 2 to 4 years Avoid April through June nesting season.
Quail Late winter 25+ acres Not critical. Do not ring fire 1 to 2 years Avoid April through June nesting season. Leave unburned patches and thickets
Dove Winter Not critical Not critical. Do not ring fire Not critical Leave unburned patches and thickets.
Waterfowl Late fall or winter Not critical Heading fire 2+ years Marshland only. Do not burn in hardwood swamps.
Control Competing Vegetation Heavy roughs in winter, otherwise not critical Not critical Not critical. Do not ring fire 2 to 8 years Summer bruns result in higher rootstock kill and affect larger stems. Exclude fire from desirable hardwoods in pine-hardwood type.
Improve Forage For Grazing Winter through late spring for most situations Not critical but will be damaged by overuse if too small for heard. Not critical. Do not ring fire 3 years Split range and burn one-third each year. Individal herbs and grasses respond differently to fire and season of burn. Consult expert.
Improve Accessibility Will vary with understory and desired use Varies with individual situation Depends on amount of fuel present As needed Coordinate with other resource objectives. They will dictate size, timing and frequency of burn.
Control Disease Brownspot, winter Depends on size of infected area. Include a buffer strip Strip-heading or heading fire 2 to 3 years Burn when humidity is above 50%. Avoid leaving unburned pockets of infected seedlings within or adjacent to burn.
Enhanced Appearance Late fall through late winter Varies with each situation Backing fire or point-source fire 1+ years Requires precise prescription to protect vegetative type changes. Know effect of fire frequency and season of burn on both annual an biennial flowering plants. Provide pleasing visual lines.
Perpetuate Fire Dependent Species Will vary with species Will vary but usually fairly small Will vary with fuel conditions and species requirements Will vary with species Fire intensity, timing and frequency all dictated by species requirements.
Young Pine Stands Winter Varies with size of stand Backing fire 2 to 4 years Pine diameter 3 inches or more at ground. Pine height above 10 ft. Burn only after a strong cold front with rain.
Dispose of Logging Debris Not critical Small areas mean fewer nighttime smoke problems Center firing with helitorch preferred -- Smoke management is a must! Take care not to damage soil or water resources with these hot fires. If a broadcast burn will not meet objectives, pile - do not windrow debris.
Prepare Sites For Seeding Natural seeding, summer to early fall prior to seed fall. Large enough to prevent concentrations of birds & rodents (usually 10 acres of more.) Not critical. Do not ring fire -- Be careful not to kill seed trees. If logging debris present, manage your smoke.
  Direct seeding, fall to late winter for spring sowing of longleaf Large enough to prevent concentration of birds & rodents (usually 10 acres or more) Not critical. Center firing with helitorch preferred if slash present -- If logging debris present, smoke management is a must! Take care not to damage soil or water resoucred with these hot fires.
Prepare Sites For Planting Growing season for hardwood control Large enough to prevent concentrations of birds & rodents (usually 10 acres or more) Not critical. Central firing with helitorch preferred if slash present. -- If logging debris present, smoke management is a must! Take care not to damage soil or water resources with these hot fires.

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Last updated on Monday, March 24, 2003 at 04:30 PM
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